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20121129
20121207
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
people who call me, they're more worried about the fiscal cliff than about rates going up a couple of points. thomas rooney in your party, if there is truly entitlement reforms that's going to preserve social security and medicare for generations to come, it's going to be very difficult for me to oppose higher rates for the rich. what about that? >> and to mr. rooney's point, if in fact there were fundamental, significant reform of medicare, medicaid and social security so that we in fact save and strengthen and secure those programs, just like we did in our budget,those were included in the president's proposal, then that's something that we would talk about and very seriously consider because there's where we got to get. we got to get real solutions. the problem with the president's proposal is it's not a real solution, it's all politics. >> congressman tom price, thank you for coming on the program. >> we've been talking about the president's advantage right now. so, karl rove was not about to sit on the sidelines. his crossroads gps is running a spot today criticizing the presi
's just silly now. you've got to be for a tax rate increase or we will go over this fiscal cliff. >> no, you don't. you could raise from a carbon tax of $20 a ton, which will deal with, we are having the biggest record carbon levels. you could raise -- at 4% a year over the next ten year, twice as much as you could from allowing the bush tax rates to lapse. why the income tax system is overburdened in the united states. we use it too much. we should be looking at other taxes. we can't do it in 29 days. why are we doing it in 29 days? >> but the president ran on raises taxes, right? if you look at the polls. 60% of people support raising taxes on people who make over $250,000 a year. how much of a problem is it, david, if the republicans you know, tom coburn said he does not want to raise that tax number. >> the president ran on his first term on opposing a health care mandate. presidents change their minds. the idea that you would do a revenue measure with an eye to basically doing something punitive, when there are much more important policy goals you can achieve and when it's not goin
that they're serious on negotiations. >> reporter: as the country fast approaches the fiscal cliff, the two sides are talking past each other. democrats say they've laid down their marker, hiking tax rates on wealthier americans. and it's up to republicans to propose specific spending cuts they want to entitlement programs. however, republicans say they've offered a concession, putting revenue on the table. and they say it's now up to the president and his fellow democrats to feel some pain and proposed cuts in medicare and medicaid. confusing? we asked harry reid. >> where is the disconnect? >> i don't understand his brain. so you should ask him, okay? >> from capitol hill to the white house, democrats are standing firm, saying the major hurdle remains whether to raise tax rates. what's next? where do things go? the top republican aide tells me they look forward to talking to the white house. >> time is still running out, too. >> and quickly. >> with us now are ryan lizza, the new yorker magazine's washington correspondent and cnn's senior political analyst ron bram's team. thank you both
, is the administration prepared to go over the fiscal cliff? >> oh, absolutely. again, there is no prospect to an agreement that doesn't involve those rates going up on the top 2% of the wealthiest. >> and that is the important phrase there, prepared to go off the cliff if there is no agreement on raising those rates. we're going to get to that in a minute. utah republican senator orrin hatch fired back and said, quote this, is one of the most stunning and irresponsible statements i've heard in some time. the american people want us to find a reasonable path forward not to rattle our sabers and play this dangerous game. of course, both sides are playing games. they are rattling their sabers. house members streamed out of the capitol and headed out of town wednesday after canceling today's session. they insist nothing will get done until the president makes a counteroffer to what they say is their full fledged proposal for monday. >> the revenues we're putting on the table are going to come from, guess who? the rich. there are ways to limit deductions, close loopholes, and have the same peop
he said, listen. >> if is the administration prepared too go over the fiscal cliff. >> absolutely. there is no prospect to an agreement that doesn't involve those rates going up on the top 2% of the wealthist, remember it's only 2%. >> he did not blink. that is the treasury secretary. do they talk like that? >> it's really unique. this treasury secretary is very loyal to this president, treasury secretaries are, but he is saying essentially that the tax rates going up are essential, that the money is not essential, that the dollar figure is not essential, that the rates going up are essential, and that's just interesting. going over the cliff comes with a lot of -- a lot of things that could affect the economy and the treasury secretary knows that. bill: 10% unemployment. tax rates for everybody going higher. what are you hearing on the house side? among the house republicans, whether or not they are behind the speaker, whether they are pulling away from him, where does that stand do you believe? >> reporter: you know, there are some on the house side that have a lot of concerns a
, i think it hurts everybody politically if we go over the fiscal cliff. republicans will pay a larger price. it's about making sure they don't drive themselves off a middle class cliff by digging their heels into lower rates. actual hadly have lower rates for the wealthy than the wealt >> tripp, you work for a group -- you're saying, hey, we stand for principle but you're not there to win elections. you're there to win policy fights. >> right. >> the fact is, if republicans could be -- some concern is republicans pulling away from the vote. >> hopefully good policy makes good politics. in this case, if we can see the tax issue, that's not going to fix the problem. the drivers of the debt is spending but also is is entitlement and boehner punting, capitulated to the white house -- >> capitulation on the white house doesn't even -- >> that's a pretty -- >> well, we're all going to put our heads in the sand and say that entitlement are not the drivers of the deficit. >> you don't think he put enough detail on the entitlements? >> no. >> we'll ask him that when he comes back. our questio
without the tax rates going back up. >> nobody wants to go over the cliff. that's why the day after the election i tried to speed this process up by making the concession to put revenues on the table. and it is unfortunate that the white house spent three weeks doing basically nothing. >> now, the republican counterproposal that we just heard about still includes those bush era tax cuts staying in place for everybody, which president obama has called a nonstarter. so what if we raised taxes a little bit? still be much lower than what americans paid just a generation ago. in 1980, the wealthiest americans paid a marginal tax rate of 70% of their income to uncle sam. now, tax reform under president reagan reduced that rate to 50% and in 1981, and closer to current levels in 1986. today, president obama wants to let the bush era tax cuts expire for wealthy americans only, taking up their marginal federal tax rate from 36% to 39.6%. we're talking about a 3.6 percentage point uptick for households making more than $250,000 a year, only on every dollar they make above the $250,000 amount.
this afternoon with brand-new republican offers to try to save the $2.2 trillion and avoid the so-called fiscal cliff. the across-the-board spending cuts and sharp tax increases that hit in just 29 days. let's get straight to our senior congressional correspondent dana bash. she's watching what's going on. dana, the tax rates, first of all, let's get to a major sticking point right now. there's been a counterproposal from house republicans to the white house. you have details. >> reporter: that's right. let's start exactly where you just began on those tax rates because that has become the big divide between the two sides. the answer is the house republicans are not budging. they still want to continue the bush era tax rates at all income levels. let's get specific. first of all, the counterproposal, they say they would get about $800 billion in savings from what they call tax reform, from deductions and closing loopholes, things like that. but the bush era tax rates, all of them would remain, even for the wealthiest. to show you the difference, compared to the white house offer that they got l
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)